James Boone

  • Birth: 18 JUL 1709 Stoak, Exeter, Devonshire, England
  • Death: 1 SEP 1785 Exeter Twp, Exeter Twp., Berks, Pa
  • Burial: PA-Berks-Exeter-Friends Burial Ground
  • Sex: M
  • Living: N

Parents:

Marriages:

  • Mary Foulke
  • Annie Griffith

Children:

Comments:

Source: The Boone Connection James Boone was born on July l8, l709 in Bradnich, England. He was the eighth child of nine born to George Boone III and his wife, Mary.

When James was eight his parents emigrated to Pennsylvania and two years later James was helping his family build their home, clear their land, and plant crops in the Oley area.

James was probably educated in England and here in Pennsylvania by his elder brothers, George and John. He was a faithful Quaker and undoubtedly attended meeting with his pareents and family.

On May 24, l735, James married Mary Foulke at the Gwyneed Meeting. She was the daughter of Hugh and Ann Williams Foulke and grandaughter of Edward and Eleanor Foulke. She was born in North Wales, Philadelphia County on Decembef 5, l7l4.

Mary Foulke's aunt, Jane Foulke, married Ellis Hughes and they also moved to Oley. It is possible that Mary visiting her aunt in Oley, met James at the Oley Meeting or, since the Boones frequently visited Gwyneed Meeting and socially intereacted with the Foulke family, she might have met James there.

Seeing that James needed a home for his wife, Goerge Boone III turned the recently completed stone house along Oley Line Road over to the young couple while he and his wife remained in the log house. Here James and Mary had fourteen childlren, nine who lived to adulthood.

In l737 James was appointed one of the overseers for the Oley Meeting. These overseers were to visit those who fell short of the standards established by the Friends. They were to exercise pastoral care, especially in matters involving morals. It was necessary for James to visit his brother, Squire, concerning the conduct of two of Squire's children. Both married non-Friends (or as it was stated “out of meeting”) and Squire was reprimanded for this. To escape the watchful eye of Oley Meeting, and for other reasons, Squire and his family, which included the famous frontierman Daniel Boone, moved to North Carolina in l750. He and his family did not join a Quaker Meeting in North Carolina and most of his children became Baptists.

James inherited his father's homestead and two hundred twelve acres in l788. He farmed the land and, along with his brother John, ran a tannery. In l780 John turned his interest in this business over to James. In l785, John sold to James one thousand, six hundred and twenty acres of land situated beyond the Blue Mountains in Berks County, along with land in Northhampton County. James also owned acreage in Alsace Township. From deeds at the courthouse in Reading, James seemed to have bought and sold many different tracts of land.

On February 20, l756, after twenty years of marriage, Mary, James wife died. She was interred at Exeter. James married again on October 20, l757 to Anne Griffith. They had no children. James died on September l, l785 and was also interred at Exeter.

In his will, James generously provided land and money for all his children. He left to Moses, besides land in Alsace Township, the Boone homestead with the two hundred and twelve acres until Moses' eldest son John became twenty-one. At that time, the homestead and land went to John. James' will also mentioned a mine located on the Boone homestead. He writes, “This mine, which if upon trial should be found worth digging, the profits should be divided among all my children in proportion to the expense each one is at digging. If any of them refuse to assist in digging or in carrying on the work they shall have no share therein, and if they all refuse then it shall belong to Moses until his son, John, becomes of age to inherit the property.

 
 
per/boone-1709-james.txt · Last modified: 2013/07/26 20:58 (external edit)
Recent changes RSS feed Creative Commons License Valid XHTML 1.0 Valid CSS Driven by DokuWiki
Drupal Garland Theme for Dokuwiki